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Pregnancy And Kidney Disease Doesn't Have To Be Hard.

Pregnancy and Kidney Disease


A desire for many women in life is to be a mother to love and hold a child of their own, but to many women this dream can feel like a burden and not a reality. For those women who are battling kidney disease there are many concerns and worries that this article would like to answer for you.


Kidney conversations would like to start with a reminder that this article is built on research using multiple platforms kidney conversations does not imply that we are medical professionals and all of your medical treatments and decisions should be made with a professional member of your medical team.


Can I have baby if I have Kidney disease?


Kidney Disease is a very hard situation on your body with your kidneys starting to fail you may see your situation as a challenge. Would adding the difficult times of pregnancy add to that difficult situation? Managing your situation can be a daunting task with high blood pressures, managing your kidney disorder be it diabetes, polycystic kidney disease adpkd, or FSGS, would raise the question is this safe for me or my baby.


Many women give birth to healthy beautiful children that have renal disease. Having children is not impossible it is more of a situation that needs to be followed with caution and medical guidance.


Stages of Kidney Disease and pregnancy.


Stage 1 Kidney Disease


If you have stage 1 kidney disease and you are pregnant, it is important to be closely monitored by your healthcare team. There is a increased risk this is due to the fact pregnancy can put extra strain on your kidneys, which could cause your kidney disease to progress to a more serious stage with a loss of kidney function and increases in serum creatinine


Your healthcare team will likely recommend that you have more frequent check-ups and urine tests during your pregnancy. They may also recommend that you make some lifestyle changes.


Stage 2 Kidney Disease


If you have stage 2 kidney disease your condition is still considered mild ckd and you are pregnant, you should talk to your doctor about how to best manage your condition. Your doctor may recommend that you have more frequent blood tests and urine tests during pregnancy. You may also need to take medication to help keep your kidneys healthy.


It is important to keep your kidneys healthy during pregnancy so that your baby can develop properly. If you have stage 2 kidney disease, you should talk to your doctor about how to best manage your condition.





Stage 3 Kidney Disease


If you have stage 3 kidney disease, your kidneys are not working as well as they should you have a more progressed renal function. This can cause problems for you and your baby during pregnancy.


Your kidneys are responsible for filtering your blood and removing waste from your body. When they are not working properly, waste can build up in your blood and make you sick. This can lead to high blood pressure, anemia, and other problems.


If you have stage 3 kidney disease, your doctor will closely monitor your health during pregnancy. You may need to take medication to help your kidneys work better. You will also need to eat a healthy diet and drink plenty of fluids.


Stage 4 Kidney Disease


If you are pregnant, your stage 4 kidney disease may put you at risk for complications, such as preeclampsia (high blood pressure during pregnancy) and premature labor. Your doctor will closely monitor your pregnancy and may recommend that you deliver your baby early.


Stage 5 Kidney Disease


Most Medical professionals with discourage pregnancy if you are in stage 5 of kidney disease until transplant surgery completion.


If you are pregnant and have stage 5 kidney disease, it is important to work closely with your healthcare team to ensure that you and your baby are as healthy as possible.




Can I have a healthy pregnancy with Kidney Disease?


There are cases in which pregnant women with chronic kidney disease experience miscarriage or experience maternal complications it is not certain that you yourself will have these experiences. With many studies that state if you are in later stages of kidney disease you are at a higher risk of miscarriage. With proper treatment and the advice of your doctor and medical team (Always highly recommended) ckd patients can have the best pregnancy outcomes and fetal outcomes.



Is pregnancy hard on the kidneys?


Many pregnant women worry about kidney failure. While pregnancy does put a strain on the kidneys, there are many things you can do to help them. Here are some tips:


1. Drink plenty of water: Drinks like tea, coffee, and fruit juices are all good sources of fluids. Aim for at least eight 8-ounce glasses a day.


2. Take breaks: Whenever you can, take short breaks to move around. This will help keep your kidneys working as they should.


3. Avoid high-salt foods: Many pregnant women are warned about the dangers of eating too much salt. While you should still aim to eat healthy foods, avoiding high-salt foods can help keep your kidneys healthy.


4. Get exercise: Exercise is great for overall health, and it can also help your kidneys. Try to get at least 30 minutes of exercise a day, whether that’s walking, or swimming. (Based only on the advice of your Medical team)


Women with chronic kidney disease kidney injury are at higher risk for issues such as adverse pregnancy and adverse maternal results that can include preeclampsia, restricted fetal growth, preterm delivery, and cesarean-section. In some cases pregnancy can cause a acute kidney injury.


With the medical and science industries working day after day to increase the treatments and procedures of kidney disease there is a new study coming out every month.


We cannot and will not guarantee that you will have a flawless pregnancy but we can give you the advice to work with your family and partner and most importantly your medical team when thinking about getting pregnant or if already pregnant.


We would like to close by adding a like to one of our other articles about Sex and Kidney Disease the first step into the building of your family.

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